Where is the most common mesothelioma in the world?

The heavy use of brown asbestos is part of the reason why the UK and Australia have the highest rates of mesothelioma in the world. Most cases of mesothelioma occur in the pleura, the tissue that lines the lungs.

Where is the most common mesothelioma in the world?

The heavy use of brown asbestos is part of the reason why the UK and Australia have the highest rates of mesothelioma in the world. Most cases of mesothelioma occur in the pleura, the tissue that lines the lungs. About 20% of cases appear in the peritoneum, which is the lining of the abdomen. Countries with the most diagnoses of mesothelioma include the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Malta, Belgium, Australia and New Zealand.

While most of Europe has completely banned asbestos, new cases emerge every year. Britain remains the epicenter of mesothelioma incidence in Europe, with the country accounting for the highest age-adjusted mortality rate in the world, with 18.36 per million people. Australia ranks second highest in the world, with an incidence rate of 16.7 per million people. Although both nations have declared the import or use of asbestos illegal, the incidence of mesothelioma continues to increase.

Asia represents the world's most rampant use of asbestos today, and China leads the way with 570,000 tons used per year. Although Asian countries such as China, Indonesia, India and Vietnam use the material, statistics related to mesothelioma and asbestos-related diseases are not readily available. However, in some preliminary studies, the incidence rate of malignant mesothelioma in China is 1.5 per million, which is substantially low for use for industrial purposes. Because mesothelioma is a rare but fatal disease, and combined with the changing landscape of asbestos exposure, mesothelioma records that capture mesothelioma cases in real time are of paramount importance for investigating the numerous unanswered scientific questions.

An interesting observation is that any change in the IR is mainly due to a decrease in the occurrence of mesothelioma in men, while the IR of mesothelioma in women remains more stable. The incidence rate of mesothelioma peaked in the late 1980s and early 1990s, but people exposed to asbestos decades ago remain at risk. In addition, the ban on the use and production of asbestos has not been implemented globally; countries that have a ban instituted it at different times (, making the estimation of the future risk of mesothelioma in the general population uncertain. The average life expectancy for a person diagnosed with mesothelioma is 18-31 months, but each diagnosis is different, since it depends on how much asbestos the person was exposed to and for how long.

There are different systems used to determine the stage of pleural mesothelioma and peritoneal mesothelioma. Countries with mesothelioma registries can investigate and respond to current scientific and legislative needs associated with mesothelioma incidence and mortality. It usually takes 20 to 60 years after exposure to asbestos for a person to develop mesothelioma. In other countries, such as China, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Mexico, Pakistan, Russia and Thailand, the use of asbestos remains prominent and, therefore, cases of mesothelioma remain on an upward trend.

However, since asbestos fibers take several years before a significant impact is noticed, the country is experiencing a level of mesothelioma crisis in recent years. Mesothelioma is a rare and aggressive form of cancer that is usually contracted as a result of exposure to asbestos. It is estimated that it could be several decades before cases of mesothelioma begin to decline in these countries, unless they begin to stop the use of asbestos sooner rather than later. If you think you've been exposed to asbestos in the past, it's important to tell your doctor, as many doctors don't automatically suspect mesothelioma.

September 26 is Mesothelioma Awareness Day, a day dedicated to disseminating information about the rarity of the disease, as well as its cause, asbestos. While asbestos has been banned there since 2004, previous exposure to asbestos is blamed for the increase in cases of mesothelioma. Some people with peritoneal mesothelioma that has not spread may have an operation called a peritonectomy, which involves the surgeon removing the parts of the peritoneum where the mesothelioma is growing. .

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Jeannie Kotzur
Jeannie Kotzur

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